Student Invited Seminar – CMM/NSC


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Dr. Robert Weinberg (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

A founding member of the prestigious Whitehead Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Robert A. Weinberg is a pioneer in cancer research most widely known for his discoveries of the first human oncogene (Ras)—a gene that causes normal cells to form tumors—and the first tumor suppressor gene (Rb). His lab now primarily focuses on two areas: the interactions between epithelial and stromal cells (the two major types of cells found in mammalian tissue) that produce carcinomas and the processes by which cancer cells invade and metastasize.

Websitehttp://wi.mit.edu/research/faculty/weinberg.html

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Dr. Karl Deisseroth (Stanford)
Awarded with the Nature 2010 Method of the Year and Science Breakthrough of the Decade (2010), Karl Deisseroth has developed a strategy to noninvasively visualize and manipulate neural circuits in vivo. This technique termed optogenetics has spawned research, in the Deisseroth lab and abroad, published in the highest-tier journals.  As a psychiatrist, Deisseroth’s current research aims at applying optogenetics for therapeutics purposes.

Website:
http://www.stanford.edu/group/dlab/research.html
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Dr. Huda Zoghbi (Baylor College of Medicine)
Huda Zoghbi is a member of the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her worked linked the methyl Cpg binding protein (MeCP2) to the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. Her current work focuses on the molecular and genetic basis of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

Website:
http://www.bcm.edu/genetics/?pmid=11053
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Dr. Victor Ambros (University of Massachusetts)
Victor Ambros is regarded for his discovery of a single stranded non-protein-coding regulatory RNA termed miRNA. miRNA have now been shown to play significant roles during many normal developmental processes, as well as pathological states such as various cancer subtypes and neurodegenerative conditions. Ambros has been awarded the Gairdner Foundation International Award and Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research (2008).
http://www.umassmed.edu/igp/faculty/ambros.cfm

Website:
http://www.umassmed.edu/igp/faculty/ambros.cfm
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Dr. Robert Horvitz (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Robert Horvitz was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2002. Horvitz’s work focused on the characterization of a novel set of genes that regulated cell death during C.elegans development. Later studies showed that these genes induce a process of normal developmental cell death referred to as apoptosis. His current research focuses on applying C.elegans to the fields of aging, neurodevelopment, cancer and behaviour.

Website:
http://www.mit.edu/~biology/facultyareas/facresearch/horvitz.html
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Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn (University of California San Francisco)
Elizabeth Blackburn was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2009. Dr. Blackburn aided in the discovery of the enzyme telomerase which replenishes telomeres. Her lab now focuses on the maintenance of telomeres and their relationship to age-related diseases.

Website:
http://biochemistry.ucsf.edu/labs/blackburn/
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